Copenhague: the restaurant of Danish sleekness

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Located on the Champs-Elysées, the House of Denmark hosts two iconic restaurants: Flora Danica and Copenhague – the first being a chic brasserie and the second one, the gastronomic restaurant with a hidden terrace – all this, alongside its cultural involvement.

I have known the institution through fashion week where Danish fashion designer Henrik Vibskov’s after parties are held. Within the highest floor the view is even more unique as you can also see the Eiffel Tower from the balcony. Note that whenever you visit Copenhagen, you will miss the city afterwards. Its food, its slow vibes and the design focus. For this restaurant, the renowned couple of the Danish agency GamFates was in charge of the interior. Facing the French capital’s most visited avenue, natural light coming through the bay windows make room for the candles throughout the evening. The atmosphere is very warmy even if the color ranges embrace dark blue and grey.

The ‘New Nordic’ cuisine is driven by chef Andreas Møller who is only in his thirties. Not far from Scandinavian roots, a vegetable garden in the back and meticulously picked farm producers allow guests to enjoy fresh and local ingredients. His flourishing creativity is converted into delicate small plates. As intriguing as inventive, each dish comes up particularly refined, sleek and chic. It’s like opening a book of drawings, admiring poetic treasures or enjoying a ballet. Expectations are high, curiosity at its epitome, I am constantly looking for the best combination of aesthetics, quality and know-how that define the basics of luxury. In addition, commitment to a certain degree of environmental consciousness is the beginning of greatness.

 

Starting off with healthy chips and seasonal vegetables, it has never felt so good to feel their actual taste. I found out about the delicacy of the oyster-based creamy butter. It may seem unusual at first but it remains very gentle. Following up with cucumber, oyster mayonnaise and self-produced caviar, these small bites were very refreshing in the mouth. Then comes a surprising declination of Jerusalem artichoke. My first impressions were completely positive!

The mackerel filet with infused and grilled cucumber, pickles-like green strawberries that give a soury-sweet touch and horseradish, looked like a painting. As a transition meal, stock poured in an egg yolk boiled at 52° Celsius for 28 min with chicken skin crumble, decorated with an edible bouquet. Last but not least, the buttered turbot was accompanied by a divine cauliflower cream sparkled of roquet, chives and thyme flowers. Eventually, for dessert, I got to discover lovage which is a plant, as a sorbet. Strawberry wedge on caramel and almond emulsion (to die for!). And surprisingly finishing with cocoa bites filled with goat cheese, sea buckthorn berries marshmallows, and lovage again.

Just a few more words, besides the fact that the chef is undeniably talented (we are all patiently waiting for him to get an upcoming star, I am convinced), I wanted to point out the impeccable service. A special thank you to the director of the restaurant Yann Clément and his team for being so passionate and caring about every single guest who was there. I am not only talking about myself but by keeping an eye around, I felt relieved: everyone was treated the same way, with excellency and coolness making the experience even better. What else can I say rather than I obviously recommend this place? This is once again a successful discovery and another good reason to love Denmark even more! After visiting twice last year, I may not go to Copenhagen very often in the near future but that’d be way easier for me to come back to the restaurant while visiting my friends and family in Paris!

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